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Communism works — in the 24th century

Published: Friday, Oct. 11, 2013 11:20 a.m. CST

Karl Marx was a genius.

Most people that know my political leanings would find the former sentence very uncharacteristic. Anyone who knows how serious I am about “Star Trek” shouldn’t be surprised.

“Star Trek” as a universe is based in utopia. 

“From each according to his ability, to each according to his need.”

No one is judged for doing a certain job, because that’s the job they are suited for. Everyone is provided for.

From a philosophical standpoint, I have a huge problem with the Affordable Care Act (Let’s stop calling it ObamaCare. It’s only feeding our President’s already large ego).

We live in a society where individuals don’t live up to their potential. 

We all know family members or friends who have certain abilities they don’t utilize. In the U.S., just because someone has a strength in something — say in mathematics — that doesn’t mean they have to go into mathematics.

They aren’t compelled to work into their strengths, but instead their interests.

I love “Star Trek,” but I realize it’s a fantasy word. A fantasy world I wouldn’t mind living in, but it’s still make-believe. 

Everyone is given as much responsibility as they can handle, but they are all given as much resources. The problem with this, though, is that in the 21st century, we don’t have unlimited resources.

Sure, I could drone on and on about CEOs who make millions of dollars in bonuses, but that’s not my point. My point is, there is only so much silver in the world. (Silver is a major component in technology.)

Without technology, a society can’t really advance. You want Third World countries to get it together? Give every child access to the Internet and see how quickly we advance as a human race.

Food, water, shelter, clothing; all of these items are limited. “Star Trek” is a universe with unlimited energy and where they can turn energy into matter. We, as a species, aren’t ready for that.

There are people in our world who choose not to contribute to society because they can. I’m not saying we shouldn’t feed or clothe these people (nor am I saying all the people we feed and clothe choose to be that way). 

I’m saying every person without a purpose is a person we have failed. Thus, we must give these people a purpose, before we give them utopia.

ACA is a step toward utopia. Let’s face it, there are people in this country, on this world, who work only because they have to. I write — not only this column, but for a newspaper in general — because I enjoy it. 

My salary, my benefits — all of the “stuff” I’m given in return for my labor — I see as a resource to continue my labor. Sure, I use my salary to have fun and entertain myself, but that entertainment is really just so I keep my sanity so I can keep doing my job.

I’m lucky. I do what I love to do. I’ve been writing for newspapers since I was 15 years old. Some people aren’t so lucky. I’d rather give people the joy that I get from writing this column than healthcare or food because the fact is, I might get hit by a bus and die on impact tomorrow.

All the food and the health care in the world won’t help me there.

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